• thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1
  • thumb1

Rest In Peace, Watoto

No More Dead Elephants - Remembering Watoto

No More Dead Elephants – Remembering Watoto

Earlier this afternoon Woodland Park Zoo announced that its only African elephant, Watoto, had been euthanized. Zoo keepers found the forty-five year old female elephant, who was brought to Seattle from Africa at the age of two, lying down and “unable to move to an upright position, which is unusual for her.” Staff spent the morning trying to lift Watoto onto her feet, but according to a press release they issued this afternoon, “it was apparent her health was quickly declining and she would likely become more uncomfortable as hours passed,” and so made a decision to euthanize her.

As has been reported extensively here Watoto was one of three elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, living in cramped confines alongside two Asian females, Bamboo and Chai. Controversy over the zoo’s elephant breeding program led to a Zoo-appointed task force last year, whose majority recommended that Watoto be shipped to another zoo to make room for a breeding elephant.

How Watoto’s death will affect the Zoo’s plans to continue their breeding program remains unknown at this time.

Advocates, including ourselves, have argued that Woodland Park Zoo should do the humane thing and close their elephant exhibit and retire its occupants to an elephant sanctuary. In 2012 the Seattle Times ran a multi-part expose on elephants in captivity, publishing data showing that for every elephant calf born in zoos two die, and that in general elephants in captivity suffer and provide no real conservation value.

Our hearts go out to Watoto, and to everyone who raised their voice in her name.

We would like to strongly encourage Woodland Park Zoo to do the right thing and retire Bamboo and Chai to a sanctuary where they can live out their days in a space better suited for these magnificent animals than the prison cell they are currently afforded. And we would like to encourage our readers to write the Zoo, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, and the Seattle City Council, and add their voices to the growing chorus calling for sanctuary.

Travel well, Watoto.

Seattle City Mayor: [email protected]
Seattle City Council: [email protected]
Woodland Park Zoo: [email protected]

Children & Nature Conservation Zimbabwe Trust

William Altoft first traveled to Zimbabwe in 2009, sparking a love for the country and an interest in all things Africa. He returned to Zimbabwe this past year to volunteer at a new project centered on conservation and education. When not volunteering abroad, he studies Wildlife and Practical Conservation at the University of Salford in the UK, where he is entering his final year.

My off-the-cuff lesson on food chains and food webs. (Photo courtesy William Altoft.)

My off-the-cuff lesson on food chains and food webs. (Photo courtesy William Altoft.)

The project that I’ve been off in Zimbabwe helping at this summer is CNCZ: Children and Nature Conservation Zimbabwe Trust. It’s a young project and primarily revolves around going to schools and teaching conservation lessons, but there is also a wildlife research element to it. The project was conceived and started by a Zimbabwean friend of mine named Evans Mabiza and is currently, and hopefully continually, based in Matobo Hills National Park, Zimbabwe. The project’s emblem is the Southern ground hornbill (Bucorvus leadbeateri), a bird endangered everywhere it is found in Southern Africa, except in Zimbabwe. CNCZ wants to know why it does so well there.

Read More »

A Tale Of Two Lunches (Il Corvo/Lecosho)

Il Corvo in Pioneer Square.

Il Corvo in Pioneer Square.

Recently I had two lunch dates in one week: one to welcome a new arrival to the Emerald City, and the second to say goodbye. Since I’m a brown-bagger most days I was thrilled when they were both willing to come into my neck of the woods for lunch and let me pick the restaurants.

The farewell lunch was with a former colleague who is heading off to Tanzania (can you see me turning green with envy?) for at least a year and maybe forever. We met at Il Corvo, which I’d been dying to go to ever since it moved from the Pike Place Market hill climb to just a couple of blocks away from my office. For some reason I had yet to make it; maybe because it takes a little effort to get there early if you don’t want to wait outside in a long line in the rain. Il Corvo, which means “the crow,” is open for lunch Monday through Friday from 11am to 3pm. Three pasta dishes are offered daily based on the season and the chef’s whim, and when they run out you have to go somewhere else. It’s a tiny place and we were lucky to get a table at 11:30am, as just a few minutes later the line was out the door and up the street.

Read More »

Birthday Eats (Joule/PiDGin)

Milk chocolate mousse with sesame and miso caramel.

Milk chocolate mousse with sesame and miso caramel.

On my birthday I can typically go one of two ways: either I want to spend it being completely low key with takeout from my favorite local gyro joint, or I want to use the occasion to try a reportedly fabulous and new (at least to me) restaurant. This year, it was the latter with a long overdue visit to Joule, run by husband and wife team Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi, who cook modern Korean cuisine in a gorgeous and bright space in Wallingford. Joule’s been around since 2007 but moved to their current locale in 2012, when they also changed up their menu. They say change is good, and it holds true here because Joule made Bon Appetit’s Top 10 new restaurants in America this past year.

We had reservations at the slick white marble chef’s counter, and as soon as we were seated we started to peruse the cocktail menu. It was a beautiful evening with light streaming in through the glass storefront, and the Patti McGee drink sounded like the perfect potion to start things off with. It was a lovely concoction of pink peppercorn vodka, shiso, rhubarb and lemon – light and refreshing with a slightly spicy, earthy twist. I’m not completely sure how the ingredients of the cocktail fit in, but Patti McGee was the 1965 Woman’s First National Skateboard Champion, just in case you were wondering. Craig went in the opposite direction with his choice of Coughlin’s 3rd Law. This is a reference from the movie Cocktail, a film I’ve never seen so I’ve yet to figure out what the 3rd law is, but it proved to be a luxurious elixir of scotch, cynar, maraschino, and grapefruit bitters.

Read More »

Remembering Hansa

Remembering Hansa on the seventh anniversary of her death.

Remembering Hansa on the seventh anniversary of her death.

On Saturday, June 7th, several dozen supporters of Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants gathered at the Zoo’s west entrance under the mid-morning sun of a beautiful spring day to hold a silent vigil in memory of the seventh anniversary of the death of baby elephant Hansa. Hansa died from EEHV, having been passed the herpes virus from her mother, Chai, who herself was exposed to EEHV while at Dickerson Park Zoo. Woodland Park Zoo was well aware of the danger of Chai contracting EEHV from Dickerson when they sent her there to be bred, but decided that the possibility of Chai coming back pregnant and the subsequent gate receipts an elephant calf would bring far outweighed any potential health risks.

Former Woodland Park Zoo Director David Hancocks’ summed up Hansa’s life, some of the abuse she endured, and the reason behind her breeding in a June 2007 article for the Seattle Post Intelligencer following the calf’s death: Hansa’s Short Life One of Deprivation.

Read More »

Profiles – Alyne Fortgang + Nancy Pennington

It’s gotten to the point where the Zoo can no longer ignore the science of elephants, and they can’t ignore public opinion. And at this point, they can no longer ignore the media. The time has come for the Zoo to finally take care of the problem and let the elephants go.

-Alyne Fortgang

Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants co-founders, Alyne Fortgang + Nancy Pennington (and Dougal + Jimmy)

Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants co-founders, Alyne Fortgang + Nancy Pennington (and Dougal + Jimmy)

If Woodland Park Zoo is to be believed, Alyne Fortgang and Nancy Pennington, the two polite women seated opposite me and the co-founders behind Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants, are “extremists” bent on undoing all the good the Zoo has created by insisting the occupants of its elephant exhibit be moved to one of two sanctuaries to allow them to live out the rest of their days in a space and climate more suitable to their species’ status as Earth’s largest land animal.

I shouldn’t be surprised, I guess. Nancy did repeatedly insist I have some banana bread during our interview, also offering me almond milk for my coffee as Dougal and Jimmy, her two very intimidating canine man-eaters, sat on her lap eyeing me menacingly the entire time. And Alyne, Nancy’s pachyderm partner in crime, did gesticulate passionately while describing where the Zoo has failed Watoto, Bamboo, and Chai, and where zoos in general are failing elephants. I can only imagine these two ladies, average age in their mid-sixties, clad in black balaclavas with crowbars in hand doing whatever it is “extremists” like them do under the cover of darkness and disguise.

Like many of Woodland Park Zoo’s other assessments, they miss the mark completely.

Read More »

Profiles – Barb Hautanen

As a child, I would spin my globe with my eyes shut, then I’d touch it to stop the spinning, open my eyes and wherever my finger landed I said to myself that I would go there.

-Barb Hautanen

Ahangama, Sri Lanka at Animal SOS, a dog and cat shelter. (Photo courtesy Barb Hautanen.)

Ahangama, Sri Lanka at Animal SOS, a dog and cat shelter. (Photo courtesy Barb Hautanen.)

Craig and I had just returned from our first global volunteering experience in Zimbabwe and we were so head over heels that it felt like our hearts had literally been ripped out of our chests as we reluctantly re-engaged with our “real” lives. To this day, we’re pretty sure our hearts are still being held hostage in Africa and patiently waiting for our return. That experience was the beginning of a life-changing passion for us and we were eager to meet others who had also traveled to global destinations and volunteered with animals, either working to conserve endangered species or helping with rescued animals in sanctuary. We had questions and concerns, dreams and ideas. But what we didn’t have were resources for first-hand knowledge beyond those we met during our time in Africa, most of whom didn’t have any more experience than we did.

Cut to a year or so later when I first heard about Elephant Nature Park in Thailand. As I started to do my research I posed a question to some of the volunteer friends we had made asking if anyone knew about ENP, and a friend of a virtual friend suggested I get acquainted with Barb Hautanen. Living in the U.S., Barb was an experienced world traveler and global volunteer and she was, literally, at ENP at the time of my inquiry. I contacted her immediately, and ever since she has been kind enough to allow me to pester her on several occasions to glean some of her sage advice.

Since that initial introduction I’ve followed tales of Barb’s adventures as she’s traveled to destinations such as Thailand, India, Nepal, and Romania, to name just a few. Barb has been able to consistently incorporate travel and volunteering into her life and I’ve been eager to learn her secrets, ask some questions, and discover what makes her tick.

I’ve never met Barb in person, but one day I will I hope to. When I do, I’m pretty sure it will not be in North Dakota or Washington State, where we each live, but in a sunny, warm climate with an ocean breeze, sights to see, and animals in need. Barb has volunteered with more organizations and in more locations than anyone else I’ve ever met and she has become a source of inspiration for me. I’m thrilled to give her the opportunity to share her story so she can inspire others as well with her wealth of experience, passion and energetic attitude.

Read More »

Skagit Tulip Festival

Skagit Tulip Festival

Skagit Tulip Festival

At 1pm on a sunny Sunday in mid-April all three northbound lanes of Interstate 5 are backed up a full ten miles south of exit 226 outside Mount Vernon, Washington. Thousands of cars are trying to make their way onto Kincaid Street and out west into the rich fields of Skagit Valley to see the tulips in bloom. Thankfully – very thankfully – we are heading south on the freeway past the backup, having arrived much earlier in the morning to roam the rows of flowers. Every April for over thirty years now the Skagit Tulip Festival has attracted visitors from around the world.

Most of the flowering fields are owned by RoozenGaarde, the largest bulb grower on the continent, and estimates put attendance during the four official weeks of the festival at around a million people. Judging by the crowds that turned out on this particular day, it’s a believable number. Despite the massive turnout and the inevitable few who ended up walking deep into rows of flowers, onto adjoining private property where they shouldn’t be, or repeatedly trampling over the corpse of at least one dead bird, it was a beautiful day day to be out among millions of tulips blooming in a dazzling array of colors and nothing could take away from our enjoyment of the springtime splendor.

Read More »

SAAS STREAM

Artist's rendition of the SAAS STREAM building. (Photo copyright The MillerHull Partnership.)

Artist’s rendition of the SAAS STREAM building. (Photo copyright The MillerHull Partnership.)

We’ve all heard about STEM education by now – Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics – and the importance of today’s students pursuing and excelling in these subjects in order to be leaders in the local and global economies of tomorrow. In the coming decades, more and more jobs will require these areas of expertise and more teachers of these subjects will be needed to ensure the knowledge continues to expand to future generations. And yet today, only sixteen percent of American high school seniors are proficient or have an interest in STEM careers. How, then, do we prove to students that STEM subjects are interesting, important to their future, and that they shouldn’t be intimidating?

Read More »

Scroll To Top